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青娱乐-青娱乐视频-青娱乐极品视觉盛宴

时间: 2019年12月14日 10:24

Perceiving there was a man near the door I went out; the man had a tomahawkwrapped under his match-coat out of sight. As I approached him he took it inhis hand; I went forward, and, speaking to him in a friendly way, perceived heunderstood some English. My companion joining me, we had some talk with himconcerning the nature of our visit in these parts; he then went into the housewith us, and, talking with our guides, soon appeared friendly, sat down and smoked his pipe. Though taking his hatchet in his hand at the instant I drewnear to him had a disagreeable appearance, I believe he had no other intentthan to be in readiness in case any violence were offered to him. Having of late often travelled in wet weather through narrow streets in townsand villages, where dirtiness under foot and the scent arising from that filthwhich more or less infects the air of all thickly-settled towns weredisagreeable; and, being but weakly, I have felt distress both in body and mindwith that which is impure. In these journeys I have been where much cloth hathbeen dyed, and have, at sundry times, walked over ground where much of theirdye-stuffs has drained away. This hath produced a longing in my mind thatpeople might come into cleanness of spirit, cleanness of person, and cleannessabout their houses and garments. HE latter part of the summer, 1763, there came a man to Mount Holly who hadpreviously published a printed advertisement that at a certain public-house he would show many wonderful operations, which were therein enumerated. At theappointed time he did, by sleight of hand, perform sundry things which appearedstrange to the spectators. Understanding that the show was to be repeated thenext night, and that the people were to meet about sunset, I felt an exerciseon that account. So I went to the public-house in the evening, and told the manof the house that I had an inclination to spend a part of the evening there;with which he signified that he was content. Then, sitting down by the door, Ispoke to the people in the fear of the Lord, as they came together, concerningthis show, and laboured to convince them that their thus assembling to seethese sleight-of-hand tricks, and bestowing their money to support men who, inthat capacity, were of no use to the world, was contrary to the nature of theChristian religion. One of the company endeavoured to show by arguments thereasonableness of their proceedings herein; but after considering some texts ofScripture and calmly debating the matter he gave up the point. After spendingabout an hour among them, and feeling my mind easy, I departed. Sixth of Ninth Month and first of the week. -- I was this day at Counterside,a large meeting-house, and very full. Through the opening of pure love, it wasa strengthening time to me, and I believe to many more. Fourteenth of Sixth Month. -- We sought out and visited all the Indianshereabouts that we could meet with, in number about twenty. They were chieflyin one place, about a mile from where we lodged. I expressed to them the care Ihad on my mind for their good, and told them that true love had made me willingthus to leave my family to come and see the Indians and speak with them intheir houses. Some of them appeared kind and friendly. After taking leave ofthem, we went up the river Susquehanna about three miles, to the house of anIndian called Jacob January. He had killed his hog, and the women were makingstore of bread and preparing to move up the river. Here our pilots had lefttheir canoe when they came down in the spring, and lying dry it had becomeleaky. This detained us some hours, so that we had a good deal of friendlyconversation with the family; and, eating dinner with them, we made them somesmall presents. Then putting our baggage into the canoe, some of them pushedslowly up the stream, and the rest of us rode our horses. We swam them over acreek called Lahawahamunk, and pitched our tent above it in the evening. In asense of God's goodness in helping me in my distress, sustaining me undertrials, and inclining my heart to trust in Him, I lay down in an humble, bowedframe of mind, and had a comfortable night's lodging. We got to Newport in the evening, and on the next day visited two sickpersons, with whom we had comfortable sittings, and in the afternoon attended the burial of a Friend. The next day we were at meetings at Newport, in theforenoon and afternoon; the spring of the ministry was opened, and strength wasgiven to declare the Word of Life to the people. 青娱乐-青娱乐视频-青娱乐极品视觉盛宴 Thirteenth of Sixth Month. -- The sun appearing, we set forward, and as Irode over the barren hills my meditations were on the alterations in thecircumstances of the natives of this land since the coming in of the English. Perceiving there was a man near the door I went out; the man had a tomahawkwrapped under his match-coat out of sight. As I approached him he took it inhis hand; I went forward, and, speaking to him in a friendly way, perceived heunderstood some English. My companion joining me, we had some talk with himconcerning the nature of our visit in these parts; he then went into the housewith us, and, talking with our guides, soon appeared friendly, sat down and smoked his pipe. Though taking his hatchet in his hand at the instant I drewnear to him had a disagreeable appearance, I believe he had no other intentthan to be in readiness in case any violence were offered to him. Last evening during thy absence I had a little opportunity with some of thyfamily, in which I rejoiced, and feeling a sweetness on my mind towards thee, Inow endeavour to open a little of the feeling I had there. In the Eleventh Month this year, feeling an engagement of mind to visit somefamilies in Mansfield, I joined my beloved friend Benjamin Jones, and we spenta few days together in that service. In the Second Month, 1763, I joined, incompany with Elizabeth Smith and Mary Noble, in a visit to the families ofFriends at Ancocas. In both these visits, through the baptizing power of truth,the sincere labourers were often comforted, and the hearts of Friends opened toreceive us. In the Fourth Month following, I accompanied some Friends in avisit to the families of Friends in Mount Holly; during this visit my mind wasoften drawn into an inward awfulness, wherein strong desires were raised forthe everlasting welfare of my fellow-creatures, and through the kindness of ourHeavenly Father our hearts were at times enlarged, and Friends were invited inthe flowings of divine love to attend to that which would settle them on thesure foundation. I was at two meetings on the 20th, and silent in them. The following morning,in meeting, my heart was enlarged in pure love among them, and in short plainsentences I expressed several things that rested upon me, which one of theinterpreters gave the people pretty readily. The meeting ended in supplication,and I had cause humbly to acknowledge the loving-kindness of the Lord towardsus; and then I believed that a door remained open for the faithful disciples ofJesus Christ to labour among these people. And now, feeling my mind at libertyto return, I took my leave of them in general at the conclusion of what I saidin meeting, and we then prepared to go homeward. But some of their most activemen told us that, when we were ready to move the people would choose to comeand shake hands with us. Those who usually came to meeting did so; and from a secret draught in my mind I went among some who did not usually go to meeting,and took my leave of them also. The Moravian and his Indian interpreterappeared respectful to us at parting. This town, Wehaloosing, stands on thebank of the Susquehanna, and consists, I believe, of about forty houses, mostlycompact together, some about thirty feet long and eighteen wide -- some bigger,some less. They are built mostly of split plank, one end being set in theground, and the other pinned to a plate on which rafters are laid, and thencovered with bark. I understand a great flood last winter overflowed thegreater part of the ground where the town stands, and some were now aboutmoving their houses to higher ground.